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The Driven Researcher

Scientists Prove Those Vaccinated for Shingles Can Infect Others with Chicken Pox

Posted by Claire Dwoskin on Sep 17, 2015 3:30:00 PM

For many years, the US government and mainstream media have continued to blame the unvaccinated community for the spread of infectious disease. We are constantly being bombarded with statements like the one written by Philip Ross and published in the International Business Times, which stated:

“The American classroom has become a battleground for parents who are threatened by the growing number of children not vaccinated against measles, one of the most highly contagious viruses in the world. The ongoing measles outbreak in the U.S. that started at Disneyland and has spread to 14 states has raised concerns over the country’s rising anti-vaccination movement, including whether the decision to vaccinate against such a dangerous disease should be left to parents, and what constitutes responsible childrearing. Should a child whose parents chose not to vaccinate be allowed to share the same pencils and playground as children whose parents did?”

Although the International Business Times had attempted to present the public with a balanced review of the situation facing parents, it is questionable as to whether they presented any real evidence to support their claims and they left many readers with unanswered questions.

Shingles Vaccines Cause Chicken Pox in the Unvaccinated

zostavax shingles vaccine

 

In 2011, a team of scientists headed by Duane L. Pierson published the paper Varicella Zoster Virus DNA at Inoculation Sites and in Saliva After Zostavax Immunization.

Their paper discusses whether or not individuals vaccinated with the shingles vaccine can remain infectious with the chicken pox virus after they had been vaccinated. To investigate this concern in more detail, the team studied 36 individuals over the age of 60 who had recently been vaccinated with the shingles vaccine, Zostavax. The scientists discovered that although the vaccine was efficient in reducing the incidence of shingles in the elderly, many of the skin and saliva samples tested positive for the varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA for up to 28 days after vaccination.

Note: Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection usually causes varicella (chicken pox) in children.

Duane Pierson stated that:

“Inoculation site samples taken within 10 minutes after vaccination were positive for Zostavax VZV DNA in 18 (50%) of 36 subjects. The VZV DNA copy number per nanogram of total DNA ranged from 28 to 2.1 × 106 (Table 1), possibly reflecting the presence of infectious virus since no alcohol or other agent was used to wipe the skin after inoculation.

No saliva specimen collected immediately before immunization contained VZV DNA. During the first week after immunization, VZV DNA was detected in saliva of 21 (58%) of 36 subjects (13 men and 8 women). During the 28-day study period, VZV DNA was found in 11 (31%) of 36 subjects (5 men and 6 women) at day 14, in 10 (28%) of 36 subjects (6 men and 4 women) at day 21, and in 2 (6%) of 36 subjects (1 man and 1 woman) at day 28.”

The authors concluded:

“Finally, that while transmission of vaccine virus has not been found among vaccine recipients, the detection of VZV DNA in saliva of Zostavax recipients for up to 28 days suggests that contact with saliva of recently immunized individuals represents a potential source of transmission.”

In other words, within ten minutes of being vaccinated with the shingles vaccine, Zostavax, fifty percent of those who had taken part in the study had skin samples testing positive for Zostavax VZV DNA, and could potentially infect unvaccinated individuals with chicken pox.

This paper is just one of many proving that it is the vaccinated who put others at risk, not the other way around. For further information, please read Studies Show that Vaccinated Individuals Spread Disease: Should the Recently Vaccinated be Quarantined to Prevent Outbreaks?

Topics: Blog

The Children’s Medical Safety Research Institute (CMSRI) is a medical and scientific collaborative established to provide research funding for independent studies on causal factors underlying the chronic disease and disability epidemic. You can follow CMSRI on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates.
  

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